LIVE LEARNING Immersive Chemistry Second Semester

This experiments-oriented course is for learners that have, or are about to, complete Immersive Chemistry First Semester. Please contact Dr Scott at info@learnwithdrscott.com if you are not sure if you are ready for this course, so that we can make sure everybody is in the right class;)

Dates and Times for Live Classes:

June 23 – Oct 1 Section:
Tuesday-Thursday 8AM PST schedule
(one lesson per week)
with Optional Review June 2-18

Summer session Second Semester Immersive Chemistry will meet every Tuesday and Thursday from June 23 to Oct 1, 2020 from 8-8:55 AM PST (Pacific time). There is a break for Labor Day (USA holiday) on Sept 8. Schedule is below image.

These chemistry classes will cover one lesson per week, and meet twice per week. Tuesdays will be the “main lecture” and Thursdays will be “worksheet review and questions.” Learners may attend both, one, or choose the pre-recorded video option for any lesson.

learn chemistry second semester course
weekTuesday 8-8:55 AM PST
Main Lecture
Thursday 8-8:55 AM PST
Worksheet Review and Questions
1June 23
Lesson 1: pH and 1-into-10 Dilutions
June 25
Lesson 1: pH and 1-into-10 Dilutions
2June 30
Lesson 2: Dilution Factors, ICE Tables and % Acid Dissociation
July 2
Lesson 2: Dilution Factors, ICE Tables and % Acid Dissociation
3July 7
Lesson 3: Strong acids, weak acids and pKa
July 9
Lesson 3: Strong acids, weak acids and pKa
4July 14
Lesson 4: Strong bases, proton acceptors, neutral salts
July 16
Lesson 4: Strong bases, proton acceptors, neutral salts
5July 21
Lesson 5: Conjugate acid-base pairs, pKb and pOH
July 23
Lesson 5: Conjugate acid-base pairs, pKb and pOH
6July 28*
Lesson 6: Neutralization Reactions & Titration Curves
July 30
Lesson 6: Neutralization Reactions & Titration Curves
7Aug 4
Lesson 7: Buffers and Shifting Equilibria
Aug 6
Lesson 7: Buffers and Shifting Equilibria
8Aug 11
Lesson 8: Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium
Aug 13
Lesson 8: Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium
9Aug 18
Lesson 9: Measuring Pressure
Aug 20
Lesson 9: Measuring Pressure
10Aug 25
Lesson 10: Experiment to Measure the Gas Constant R
Aug 27
Lesson 10: Experiment to Measure the Gas Constant R
11Sept 1
Lesson 11: Analyzing Gasses
Sept 3
Lesson 11: Analyzing Gasses
12Sept 8
LABOR DAY (USA) BREAK NO CLASS
Sept 10
Lesson 12: Filtration and Thermal Degredation
(Main Lecture)
13Sept 15
Lesson 13: Kinetics & The Iodine Clock Reaction
Sept 17
Lesson 13: Kinetics & The Iodine Clock Reaction
14Sept 22
Lesson 14: Kinetics and Equilibrium
Sept 24
Lesson 14: Kinetics and Equilibrium
15Sept 29
Lesson 15: Electrochemistry
Oct 1
Lesson 15: Electrochemistry
*It’s Dr. Scott’s birthday, and he is hoping for some beautiful lab reports;)

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Course Information

Prerequisite: You are ready for this course if you have completed Immersive Chemistry – First Semester or a similar course covering polyatomic ions, IMFs, balancing reactions, limiting reactants, titration, and designing experiments.

Description: You’ll continue to learn more about science by using analogies that relate to concepts you already know well. Plus, you’ll see and perform a variety of laboratory activities to reinforce the concepts hands-on. Most of the advanced math, technical jargon, complicated chemicals and fancy lab equipment have been removed from the topics so you can truly master the chemistry concepts. In additional to covering all those important, traditional, second semester chemistry topics that would be found in a textbook, you’ll learn practical stuff and deeper insights into real world chemical systems. We’ll spend about half the course understanding acid-base-water chemistry conceptually, in addition to making pH predictions. You’ll learn how the whole world is in equilibrium, why matter flows, the conditions under which chemical reactions occur (or not), how to generate electricity, and the relation of all these concepts to this invisible stuff called energy.

There’s a written assignment, with solutions, for each lesson so that the ideas sink in. You’ll get up to speed with chemistry fast and develop the skills needed to have fun applying what you know about chemistry and science to understand how the world works.

The big ideas you{ll be learning:

  1. Understanding what happens in and over water, the world’s most common perhaps most complex substance
  2. Explaining the world using equilibrium
  3. Understanding the difference between equilibrium vs a changing system
  4. Analyzing and (optionally) building heterogeneous, flowing experimental rigs
  5. Using logarithms, equations, and tables of scientific data to make predictions
  6. Generating electricity