Writing Science Lab Reports: Live Learning

Writing Science Lab Reports: Live Learning
Dates and Times for Live Classes:

Writing Science Lab Reports Live Class
Oct 13-27, 2020
Tuesday 8-8:50 AM PST / 11-11:50 AM EST Schedule

We meet 3 consecutive Tuesdays October 13, 20 and 27. Each live class is an hour long. This is a great laboratory course to take along with any chemistry course. We do a different experiment each month.

Writing Lab Reports: Balloon Pressure will focus on estimating the pressure inside a balloon. We will first inflate a balloon using the gas produced from a chemical reaction. We will carefully control how much gas is generated. Then, we will apply the Ideal Gas Law to estimate the pressure inside the balloon. We will conclude with a discussion of how to best conduct the experiment, practically, to get the best results at home.

weekTuesdays 8-8:50 AM PST / 11-11:50 AM EST
1October 13
Before the Experiment: Design and Reporting
Bring to class: blank paper and pen (not pencil)
2October 20
During the Experiment: Getting the Data
Bring to class: Your report from week 1 and (optionally) your experiment:* Inflate a balloon with gas generated by the baking soda and vinegar reaction. Measure the volume with a ruler and temperature with a thermometer to find the pressure.
3October 27
After the Experiment: Analysis and Discussion of Results
Bring to class: Your report from weeks 1-2. Also bring a calculator.
*(optional) to experiment at home you need: baking soda, vinegar, measuring cup (mL), water bottle, balloons, ruler, thermometer (optional), scale (optional)

Writing Science Lab Reports Live Class
Sept 22 – Oct 6, 2020
Tuesday 1-1:50 PM PST / 4-4:50 PM EST Schedule

We meet 3 consecutive Tuesdays September 22, 29 and October 6. Each live class is an hour long. This is a great laboratory course to take along with any chemistry course. We do a different experiment each month.

This month we consider separations, which means “un-mixing” things to obtain pure substances. It’s a really big yet underappreciated aspect of chemistry. And it’s going to be easy to understand.

If you are taking or plan to take First Semester Chemistry, take this course now to save time later.

writing lab reports separations experiment
weekTuesdays 1-1:50 PM PST / 4-4:50 PM EST
1September 22
Before the Experiment: Design and Reporting
Bring to class: blank paper and pen (not pencil)
2September 29
During the Experiment: Getting the Data
Bring to class: Your report from week 1 and (optionally) your experiment:* separate a sand and salt mixture by dissolving, filtering, and crystallizing (boiling off the water, with adult supervision)
3October 6
After the Experiment: Analysis and Discussion of Results
Bring to class: Your report from weeks 1-2 and (optionally) your crystallized salt from boiling the salt water (with and adult) from week 2. Also bring a calculator.
*(optional) to experiment at home you need: salt, sand, water, a funnel, coffee filters (or paper towels), a bowl, and empty water bottle, and some measuring spoons. You may boil water in a pot with adult supervision between the second and third class. Optionally, a small digital scale would be cool, but it’s not necessary.

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Course Information

Prerequisite: You are ready for this course if you can write in paragraphs.

Description:  We design an experiment, do the experiment, and write a report about the experiment. This class is offered every month or so, and we change the experiment each time. This time, we do the titration experiment.

You also get Dr Scott’s 23 simple steps for making a good lab report every time, guaranteed. In both video course and written formats.

The big ideas you’ll be learning:

  1. Writing a solid, readable lab report that tells a story
  2. Making a template for future lab reports to save time
  3. Thinking like a scientist before, during, and after the experiment
  4. Organizing data
  5. Making measurements that are scientifically precise